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Language Codes
Language Codes
Content language codes

The language codes use the pattern of Alpha-3 (bibliographic) coding, Alpha-3 (terminology), and the Alpha-2 system, which means that an English language name is taken or the French by using | separator. In practice, translating code takes two or three letters for abbreviation, using either English language or native (endonyms) as the source. 

In order to identify the language according to international standards, translation codes can be encoded with a help of either ISO 639-1 (also known as alpha-2 coding) or ISO 639-2 (alpha-3):   

1. ISO 639-2 uses three-letter pattern abbreviations. Currently, there are 21 language exceptions that have more than two letters for bibliographic or technical purposes. It uses a "B" or "T" addition. 

2. ISO 3166-1 is used for those geographical territories that have historical dependence or areas that are in a dispute. An example is Riau province of Indonesia, which has an ID-RI language translation code. 

3. Another 3-letter coding is common for Chinese dialects. It is a 639-3 listing (SIL International). 

4. If you encounter "S", it stands for a simplified language, while "T" addition means traditional writing. 

The list below is updated once any changes are introduced. Make sure to check twice when translating codes. 
 

Language

Code

Afrikaans

af

Albanian

sq

Arabic (Bahrain)

ar-bh

Arabic (Egypt)

ar-eg

Arabic (Qatar)

ar-qa

Arabic (Saudi Arabia)

ar-sa

Arabic (U.A.E.)

ar-ae

Basque

eu

Belarusian

be

Bulgarian

bg

Catalan

ca

Chinese (Hong Kong)

zh-hk

Chinese (PRC)

zh-cn

Chinese (Singapore)

zh-sg

Chinese (Taiwan)

zh-tw

Croatian

hr

Czech

cs

Danish

da

Dutch (Belgium)

nl-be

Dutch (Standard)

nl

English

en

English (Australia)

en-au

English (Belize)

en-bz

English (Canada)

en-ca

English (Ireland)

en-ie

English (New Zealand)

en-nz

English (South Africa)

en-za

English (United Kingdom)

en-gb

English (United States)

en-us

Estonian

et

Faeroese

fo

Farsi

fa

Finnish

fi

French (Belgium)

fr-be

French (Canada)

fr-ca

French (Standard)

fr

French (Switzerland)

fr-ch

Gaelic (Scotland)

gd

German (Austria)

de-at

German (Liechtenstein)

de-li

German (Luxembourg)

de-lu

German (Standard)

de

German (Switzerland)

de-ch

Greek

el

Hebrew

he

Hindi

hi

Hungarian

hu

Icelandic

is

Indonesian

id

Irish

ga

Italian (Standard)

it

Japanese

ja

Korean

ko

Kurdish

ku

Latvian

lv

Lithuanian

lt

Malayalam

ml

Malaysian

ms

Maltese

mt

Norwegian

no

Polish

pl

Portuguese (Brazil)

pt-br

Portuguese (Portugal)

pt

Punjabi

pa

Rhaeto-Romanic

rm

Romanian

ro

Russian

ru

Serbian

sr

Slovak

sk

Slovenian

sl

Sorbian

sb

Spanish (Argentina)

es-ar

Spanish (Bolivia)

es-bo

Spanish (Chile)

es-cl

Spanish (Colombia)

es-co

Spanish (Costa Rica)

es-cr

Spanish (Dominican Republic)

es-do

Spanish (Ecuador)

es-ec

Spanish (El Salvador)

es-sv

Spanish (Guatemala)

es-gt

Spanish (Honduras)

es-hn

Spanish (Mexico)

es-mx

Spanish (Nicaragua)

es-ni

Spanish (Panama)

es-pa

Spanish (Paraguay)

es-py

Spanish (Peru)

es-pe

Spanish (Puerto Rico)

es-pr

Spanish (Spain)

es

Spanish (Uruguay)

es-uy

Spanish (Venezuela)

es-ve

Swedish

sv

Swedish (Finland)

sv-fi

Thai

th

Tsonga

ts

Tswana

tn

Turkish

tr

Ukrainian

uk

Urdu

ur

Venda

ve

Vietnamese

vi

Welsh

cy

Xhosa

xh

Yiddish

ji

Zulu

zu

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